Tarpon regularly run the coastline from Rio Parismina to Nicaragua. They are also found in the Tortuguero river, and we've caught some of our biggest in the rivermouth. The river is also home to younger smaller resident tarpon. As well, anglers can look forward to catching, in season, mackerel, jack crevalle, red snapper, green jacks, snook, fat snook, mojarra, barracuda, and many other species.

Catch & Release: Please note that our policy for tarpon is catch & release; occasionally, however, a fish dies during the fight. Nothing is wasted, however - the local people make a delicious coconut-based soup called rondon with the meat.

When
to Come

What to Bring

See the FAQ page for general information on what to bring.

Although we have all the tackle you’ll need on hand, including rods and reels, we recommend the following:

- For those of you that have rods rated 30-65 pounds, and reels that have a capacity for 400 yards of 30lb braid, please feel free to bring them.
- For casting in the river for snook, etc., medium spinning tackle with 8-15lb line will suffice.
- Lures & Terminal Tackle: small to magnum floating rapalas
- 1-3 oz jigs in various colors
- surface poppers
- 5/0 6/0& 7/0 circle hooks
- 100lb fluorcarbon for leaders
- sabiki rigs, hook size 8-10 

Contact us for more information about the best fishing times

The Boat

Our boat is a 28 foot fiberglass panga, equipped with two Suzuki 115 outboard motors. The reason we have two outboards is because going in and out of the river mouth to the ocean requires steady power and if one motor "hiccups" our boat will still get you out, and back in, safely. Two to four people can comfortably fish in the boat.

Below: after weeks of work, twelve able fellows from the village helped us launch Sabaloco. The name joins the Spanish for tarpon - sabalo - with loco, because we are crazy for tarpon, of course!

aaaaaaaaaaaaiii